In April 2008 the State of New York inserted an item in the state budget asserting sales tax jurisdiction over Amazon.com sales to residents of New York, based on the existence of affiliate links from New York–based websites to Amazon.[45] The state asserts that even one such affiliate constitutes Amazon having a business presence in the state, and is sufficient to allow New York to tax all Amazon sales to state residents. Amazon challenged the amendment and lost at the trial level in January 2009. The case is currently making its way through the New York appeals courts.

LinkConnector is something of a mixed bag, so it’s probably best for experienced affiliates who have become disillusioned with other networks and are looking to expand. LinkConnector’s bizarre mix of high-quality products and a low-quality dashboard make it hard to truly assess its viability, but their exclusive deals with some vendors can make it a true home run for publishers working in certain niches.


Another difference is that with affiliate marketing business, an affiliate can sell different products all at the same time. His selling potential is limitless. Even if the products are not related to one another, he can still do affiliate marketing. He only needs to create a separate website to market different products. Unlike with offline middleman marketing, a middleman must only sell related products to maintain his credibility, for who would take a salesman seriously who sells cars and baby products at the same time?
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